The Final Harry Potter = The Death of My Childhood.

18 07 2011

I just got home, after seeing the final Harry Potter movie with my husband.

It was, in a mere word, epic.

Truthfully, it was probably one of the best movies I’ve ever seen. The characters came alive in this movie, and the contrast between good and evil was so strong that it gave me the chills. The humor was perfect, the action magnificent, and the conclusion was a tear-jerker. I loved every moment.

Heck, even the cynical reviewers at Rotten Tomatoes gave it a 97% approval rating.

But I found myself troubled and perplexed at the end of the movie, as the credits rolled across the screen. I couldn’t really put my finger on it until I got to the car and started to drive home:

With Harry meeting his inevitable conclusion, I must face the reality that my childhood has now disappeared.

In a very real sense, I grew up with Harry Potter. I stumbled across the first book in the series when I was going into eighth grade, right after my family had uprooted from central Illinois to live in the Twin Cities. It was my first summer–a cold summer, at

Me with my family, when I was 13.

that– in a brand-new place, where I knew no one. While I made friends quickly when school started, Harry and his friends were my comfort in that first strange summer in Minnesota when I had nothing but pesky mosquitoes and my faithful dog to comfort me.

In high school, I awaited eagerly for each new book in the series. My friends and I went to nearly every midnight screening for each new movie–even when it meant we had to go straight from a graduation ceremony to the theater, still dressed in our formal attire.

In college, I read and reread the books. When a family friend gave me a brand-new copy of the last book while I was home on break, I stayed up all night reading it.

While in various classes in college, my friend Stephanie and I even came up with an entire character cast using all of the people at our university as subs for Rowling’s characters.

I was working at Universal Studios in Orlando, Florida, when it was announced that they had gained the rights to the Harry Potter theme park. I saw the celebration and pride first-hand, and I marveled that I got to be a part of it.

In the last few years, as I’ve worked as a youth leader, I’ve loaned out my copies of the movies to hoards of kids. I’ve talked about the books and the movies more times than I can count, and I’ve even watched the movies with teenagers in my apartment.

Harry Potter has been a constant in my life in the last twelve years. It’s outlasted my favorite sweaters, the framed pictures I thought I’d never put in a box, and my favorite CDs. It’s outlast three generations of iPods, two laptops, and my digital cameras.ย It’s outlasted my boyfriends, several homes, my first car, my childhood pets, five drastically different hair colors, countless vision prescriptions, four years’ worth of roommates, and my best friends.

It’s lasted longer than nearly everything else in my life, really. The only things that even come close are my Anya Hindmarch bag and my Rainbow sandals (eight years and six years, respectively).

And now–it’s over.

I know this seems melancholy. And it’s very personal. But after all, my blog ultimately my place to share my own thoughts, unfiltered.ย I think the world would be a much better place if we could actually share our true feelings, fears, and joys with each other. So I guess that’s what I’m doing: sharing my truth, even when it’s not so rosy or politically correct.

I can’t be the only one who has faced this–the death of childhood and the road into adulthood. However, it feels like I’m alone in it since no one has ever really been honest enough to tell me that this is what it’s like (similar to how no one would confess to how horrific soccer tryouts would actually be in high school, really).

This feeling that my carefree days are totally behind me….the knowledge that my life now consists of tracking and paying bills, taking dogs to the vet, working, and making dentist appointments…

Peter Pan sure had the right idea, I tell you.

It’s not that I want to prolong my adolescence, by any means. I’ve always been ready to grow up–whether it was tackling Jane Eyre at ten, flying alone across the country at twelve, writing my autobiography at thirteen, moving across the country at eighteen, or handling a hall of forty residents at nineteen.

I guess this just seems like the final blow to my childhood.

Kind of that “Holy cow, I’m actually an adult” moment.

Sure, there are plenty of perks to being an adult. For one, I get to buy whatever I want at the grocery store–I don’t have to convince my mother that I really need it.

Also, I get to burn candles whenever I want–despite the fact that my brother and I set my trashcan on fire once and I was banned from ever owning candles again.

But secretly, I sometimes wish I could go back to my carefree days twelve years ago–back when my biggest worry was finishing Harry Potter before sunrise.

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255 responses

18 07 2011
sarahnsh

Harry Potter was also a childhood comfort for me too. I remember being in lines to get the book as soon as it came out and dragging my family to take me there. I still haven’t seen the last movie, but I’m sure I’ll have the same mixed feelings. It definitely is a comfort and like the final curtain on your childhood.

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19 07 2011
bestdancemoves

As the whole potter saga end’s .. i still have this question, i had 10 years ago.. no offense but “when harry knew magic, why didn’t he correct his eye sight?”. I mean it’s understandable that it was his avatar and all but was it the same with Dumbledore? Yeah with final movie there goes my chance of finding the answers!

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19 07 2011
RamblingRev

Interestingly, when Harry is in “King’s Cross” at the end of the movie, he isn’t wearing his glasses.

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19 07 2011
Mallika :)

I think magic doesn’t repair natural things..
Otherwise why would they have St. Mungo’s?

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18 07 2011
mallfar

That is wonderful blog, I love it also .

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18 07 2011
julieburridge

I felt the same way when Pee Wee’s Playhouse was canceled. But I’ve never been a big Potter fan (gasp!). In fact, I refuse to watch the last movie. Find out why at http://www.popnology.com

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18 07 2011
ashleez

dunno how people like it :/

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18 07 2011
Mallika :)

You should check out the Facebook Harry Potter fan-pages.. Everyone there, adults/children talk about how their childhood has ended.. So, just saying.. you’re not alone. ๐Ÿ™‚
Loved the post, and not just ’cause it’s Harry Potter related. ๐Ÿ˜€

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18 07 2011
Mallika :)

Oh, and congrats on being WordPressed. ๐Ÿ™‚ 8)

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18 07 2011
Mikalee Byerman

Beautiful sentiment. I think many of us can track our “growing up” based on which Harry Potter movie was out at the time — an epic series, indeed…

๐Ÿ™‚

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18 07 2011
pyricha

It all ends!!!
So sad T^T

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18 07 2011
jenillemanzo

“… when my biggest worry was finishing Harry Potter before sunrise.”

Indeed! More than the nostalgia the last Harry Potter movie brought, it also reminded me that it is because of the HP series I love to read books. And that influence can’t be outlasted, so far. Thanks for the post!

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19 07 2011
Joy Corsame

I can so relate to that line also! I do not have my own Harry Potter books, my friends just lend me. So I am kind of required to finish the book within 3 days, that was why I have been reading between classes.

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18 07 2011
Damian Trasler

This is beautiful, and I’m really sorry you feel you’ve reached the point where you’ve become an adult. With just a few weeks to my 39th birthday and three kids and dozens of house moves, I’m still waiting to feel all grown up. What I loved about Harry Potter was the feeling of recapturing the joy of childhood reading. Someone said recently that the later books were just too dark, that they didn’t keep the magical promise of the first one. I don’t particularly agree, but I understand – that first volume, with the great treasure trove of discovery from Hagrid’s unforgettable first appearance to the inspired madness of Hogwarts (and didn’t that remind you of your first days at High School? Where the heck IS that classroom? Where the heck am I?) and the sumptuous feats after Harry’s near-starvation… Magic, that’s what it was.

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18 07 2011
prettyhungrygirl

Reading this… you and I are so much alike! I loved every single Harry Potter book and grew up right along with the characters. I loved Jane Eyre. And I used to have to convince my dad I needed certain grocery items and now consider “buying whatever I want at the grocery store” to be one of the high points of adulthood.
You’re not alone in mourning the end of these dear friends and this huge adventure ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks for writing a post that speaks to so many in “our generation.”

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18 07 2011
12 Novels in 12 Months

I know exactly how you feel. I don’t have as strong an attachment as you to the series but it is a shock when something that so defined a period in your life comes to its end. You’re lucky that one of the definitive hallmarks of your childhood is tangible and preserved in both literature and film.

It may be a bittersweet moment as most transitions to the next stage of life are but take comfort that you can always return to something that gave you so much comfort and fulfillment in your life. You can never lose that connection, just don’t lose the sense of wonder and perspective you had with you were younger. If you can retain that, you’ll never truly grow up. Keep your inner child alive!

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18 07 2011
Julio Ibanez

Nicely put!

With a 14 year span from first book release to now, there are a lot of folks who either grew up with the books or have tracked some major life events along with it. It’s been interesting hearing those stories. Thanks for sharing yours!

And congrats on being Freshly Pressed! ๐Ÿ™‚

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18 07 2011
The Final Harry Potter = The Death of My Childhood. (via Cassie Moore’s Blog) « savmontero

[…] I just got home, after seeing the final Harry Potter movie with my husband. It was, in a mere word, epic. Truthfully, it was probably one of the best movies I've ever seen. The characters came alive in this movie, and the contrast between good and evil was so strong that it gave me the chills. The humor was perfect, the action magnificent, and the conclusion was a tear-jerker. I loved every moment. Heck, even the cynical reviewers at Rotten Tomat … Read More […]

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18 07 2011
politeandparanoid

I wrote an autobiography at thirteen, too!! LOL! I think the death of my childhood came to me last year. It was hard and depressing. Not dwelling on it really helped me. Looking at the future and all the things God has in store for me lessened the blow. The best is yet to come (Never doubt that)! Congrats on Freshly Pressed ๐Ÿ™‚

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18 07 2011
KimoneCloud

omg i never even thought about it that way. i haven’t viewed the last part because i’m waiting for my bro to come back from england to watch it with him ๐Ÿ˜ฅ my childhood is dead

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18 07 2011
Kathryn McCullough

And with end of Harry Potter you now have Freshly Pressed to mark the moment adulthood begins! Congrats on that! And hang on for the ride!
Kathy

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18 07 2011
atozmom

I love this! I love the realness of it. I myself am trying to find that happy medium on my blog as well. It’s so focused yet it’s also about me and when I reveal my true feelings, I sometimes feel criticized for feeling such–like I’m wrong to feel such longings, sorrows, not understanding what’s happening in my life, and yearning for an answer that I know God has for me but which I am impatient to wait for and am trying desperately to understand…..Bless you for sharing your true feelings.
Sigh.
Harry Potter is one of my favorites along with Twilight. My dream is to write something as lasting as those two amazing authors have. God willing, I will. But waiting and longing still fills my soul…

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18 07 2011
Vasu

Hi Cassie,
What a lovely write-up! Better than most analytical reviews you get these days ๐Ÿ™‚
The title of the post captures it all. To me, I had to see the film, however good or bad it may have been, and frankly it didn’t disappoint.
I was a touch nostalgic / emotional after it was all over, as it has indeed been an epic journey!
Cheers,
Vasu

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18 07 2011
stellacarolyn

I hear you. But differently. For me, Harry Potter came along at a time when I was already an adult- albeit a young one. So to hear that someone who grew up with the series is now an adult makes me feel even more strongly that MY childhood is over– and I didn’t even see it coming, despite the fact that it’s technically been over for at least 15 or so years!!!

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18 07 2011
Army Amy

I teach 7th grade English, and every year I have students discovering and loving the books. Although it marks the end of your childhood, the great thing about HP is that he and the magic live on.*

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18 07 2011
thebigbookofdating

I LOVED the book but I am sorry to say I never got into the films

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18 07 2011
alie

ICompletelyUnderstand!!!
In fact I wrote a similar blog post the other day, as I’m reading this, we’ve pretty much written exactly the same sentiments. http://searchingforourselves.wordpress.com/2011/07/14/on-the-end-of-an-era/

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18 07 2011
grabbagok

That was a fun read, I’m sorry about your childhood being murdered though. I was the complete opposite– I never watched a single Harry Potter film until this week. I decided to watch all 8 Harry Potter movies this past week and blogged about the experience. Check it out! ๐Ÿ™‚

http://grabbagok.com/2011/07/11/the-harry-potter-project-a-harry-potter-virgin-watches-all-8-movies-in-5-days/

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18 07 2011
The Simple Life of a Country Man's Wife

My sister was so sad it was over. I didn’t follow HP very closely, but I know just the feeling you write about. It’s the whole “coming of age” moment we all have now and then. Bittersweet, huh?

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18 07 2011
amanda

What an awesome sentiment. I get it completely in a different regard since I was already done with high school by the time Harry Potter came out. All I can say tho is that the magic is and will always still be there. In re-reading or re-watching and sharing with future generations ๐Ÿ™‚

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18 07 2011
Alyssa

I felt much the same after I saw the movie last night. I sat in the movie and cried. Not because of the story itself, but it was the end of an era, the end of my youth and my childhood. Ever since I read the first book, I’ve been waiting for Harry Potter. Waiting for the books, waiting for the movies… Now, what am I waiting for? ๐Ÿ™‚
It was good and I really enjoyed it. Though, I’m saddened by the loss of my childhood fantasy.

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18 07 2011
Premjeet Kaur

The Harry books didnt come out until I was very much an adult (age wise anyway)… but the big kid in me loves them, and I have read and re-read the books over and over. I havent got to see the last movie yet but I am sure it will be bittersweet for me as well. I havent had friends to share the harry journey with, but I have loved it on my own. Right down to sobbing so much the first time I read Dumbledore’s death scene, I had to go finish reading in the bathroom so that I wouldnt wake my husband up. LOL Same for Dobby. Thankfully we can revisit Harry’s world anytime we want, be it in books or movies. It’s nice to have some magic in the world… anyway ๐Ÿ˜‰

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18 07 2011
Onefineham

I think an entire generation wears your shoes ๐Ÿ™‚

Seriously, I was thinking about this the other day, how many people have enjoyed watching Harry & Co. grow up and face challenges, and where will the next entertainment marvel come from to fill the void?

A lot of people are already missing Harry, longing for a new adventure.

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18 07 2011
theveryhungrybookworm

I JUST wrote a post about Harry and how my childhood feels like it has ended as well! I completely understand.

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18 07 2011
watermeloun

Yep, the Harry Potter has changed our lives forever ๐Ÿ™‚

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18 07 2011
Becca

I blogged about the exact same topic and i’m glad to know I’m not the only one who feels this way about Harry Potter. And I agree the movie was, for lack of better words: epic.

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18 07 2011
simplydelete

This post brought tears to my eyes. I’m in the same boat as you. I got into the series when I was in the seventh grade and have loved it ever since. We definitely grew up with the characters, and to know that it is all over is really bittersweet. It’s nice to see the end of the movies, but now all I keep thinking is: now what? I have no more books or movies to wait for. The good thing is that I know I can continue to re-read and re-watch the books and movies. I’m definitely sharing the books when I have kids too. Great post!

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18 07 2011
Nerdygirl98

I totally agree. Today my 13th birthday, and I saw it yesterday and it literally is the death of my childhood also. I probably picked it up in 1st grade maybe? Now, going into 8th grade I am truly sad. Thanks for the lovely post that helped me make the connection on how I felt afterwards.

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18 07 2011
Shbnkr

hey nice post. i too am a harry potter fan and i can identify with your post. Truly the harry potter books have been fantastic and truly epic!!

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18 07 2011
Sammi

Oh my god. I know exactly what you mean! Harry Potter was part of my adolescence and now that it’s over, it’s like I’m a real grown up now! I’m not sure how I feel about that. But I will say, like you, all those midnight book releases and movie premieres were a blast and I would never take them back. And like you, my friend and I in college named all the people in one of our classes after HP characters as well!

So, from one Harry fan to another I just have to say, we may be adults now, but Harry and the gang will always keep us young!

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18 07 2011
Ayrim

I was 14, when I watched the first movie of Harry Potter. I read all the books and I was very disappointed when fi, I saw last Harry Potterยดs movie. I thought that it would be the final epic battle between evil and good. The final duel between Voldermort and Harry is a short scene and the characters that passed away is only a sequence of two seconds. I prefer the last book rather than this movie…

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18 07 2011
dweebcentric

Actually, this is an interesting post, given your “disciple of Christ” introduction (in the About Me section) and that religious groups rallied against the immensely popular series early on, saying that it instilled in young readers teachings of witchcraft and other hooey. See, those kids didn’t turn out so bad, did they? In fact, they found something they were passionate about reading!

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18 07 2011
Aisiri

My childhood.. yeah.. since I am still only sixteen and started reading HP at the age of 7.. I still feel old.
Liked the blog.
Loved it.
too much.

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19 07 2011
Damian Trasler

Oh wow! HAlf your life reading Harry Potter! NOW I feel old!

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18 07 2011
The Logophile

I really enjoyed your post. Congrats on FP. I, unlike you, did not feel this attachment to Harry Potter. I read them and loved them but it didn’t capture my childhood in it. I know what you are saying and occasionally I feel the way you feel in other things. It isn’t easy growing up, I say get hooked on something else.

I have watched TV shows for years that I felt like they were my family. When they ended, I felt like I lost my family. Like Friends. Really nice post. Really well written.

Now I gotta go see the movie.

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18 07 2011
JL

Last statement: completely true!!

When I was a child, my Christian-paranoid parents forbade me from even looking at the cover of Harry Potter. But in grade three at silent reading time, I had already gone through almost every book and picked up the Prisoner of Azkaban. I fell in love with it, even though I had no idea what half of it was talking about as I hadn’t read the first book yet. After that it became a race between my friends and I to see who could read Harry Potter the fastest! LOL… and now… nine years later, the price of the movie ticket to see HP bothers me more than Voldemort. )=

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18 07 2011
Gail

As the parent of 2 sons who also grew up with Harry Potter, I know exactly how you feel. Harry has been a big part of our lives, hasn’t he? Great post which was extremely well expressed! Congrats on getting Freshly Pressed!

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18 07 2011
d1esel6

i didn’t read this whole thing, but i find it funny the title says the last Harry Potter film was the death of your childhood, but than the first sentence says “my husband” LOL!!! shouldn’t your childhood have ended around the time you got engaged. like when you entered into an ADULT committed relationship that should have been the end of your childhood (if not sooner) — and i’m just curious about the books? wouldn’t the last book also signal the end of your childhood?

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18 07 2011
MaximumWage

I dont know, maybe its just me. Maybe your childhood ended when you turned 18? ๐Ÿ™‚ can’t wait to see the movie and PS theres going to be other films just wait.

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18 07 2011
lulz@mail.com

“With Harry meeting his inevitable conclusion, I must face the reality that my childhood has now disappeared.” lol

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18 07 2011
_nui

Sadly, this is the end of harry potter series ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

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18 07 2011
AnitaAnswers

The HP series, like the films, deserve accolade upon accolade. JKRowling make imagination real. I loved the latest film, made the premier for the first time. Worth the long lines at concession stand.

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18 07 2011
amaliaelizabethb

This last Harry Potter movie does feel like a death of my childhood, and its hitting me more than the end of the Toy Story Movies, which in a different way represent the same thing.

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18 07 2011
grabbagok

Congrats on being Freshly Pressed!
I’ve heard a lot of people say they feel the same way now that the HP series is over. We recently watched all the films in 5 days and did reviews on each of them. A lot of people that reading about someone new discovering the series has given them a little comfort now that everything is over. You should stop by and check it out if you have time. ๐Ÿ™‚

http://grabbagok.com/2011/07/11/the-harry-potter-project-a-harry-potter-virgin-watches-all-8-movies-in-5-days/

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18 07 2011
TCG

Great post! I feel similarly, but I had The Chronicles of Narnia, The Dark Is Rising, and LOTR before HP, and I know there will be another series to delve into. Actually there’s one by Henry Neff that I adore and it’s not all published yet, so that’s something to look forward to! I’m just thankful there’s such an abundance of literary magic to get lost in.

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18 07 2011
jessicaber

Thank you so much for sharing this. I was working at Borders Books Music & Cafe in Phoenix, AZ when the very first Harry Potter book came out in the summer of 1999. It was a pretty trendy book store and I am from rural Vermont so I noticed when the trendy westerners came in day after day to buy books or peruse. Harry Potter was an instant success and everyone was talking about JK Rowlings, the British lady on public assistance who made it out of poverty with her writing. Now I am still single. I am a mother whose son is starting 1st grade next year. I am back in Montpelier, Vermont, pretty much my home town, well I was raised in East Montpelier, Vermont. I am glad that you came out okay. Thank you again for sharing, truly.

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18 07 2011
bobee8

I will feel sooooo bad!!!!! I love the films and the books. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

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18 07 2011
Jenny

Totally relate! I started reading the series in ’99 when I was fifteen. Back then, the most important thing was getting my hands on a new copy after it had been released! Watching the movie reminded me of those carefree days.

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18 07 2011
wiibii

COMPLETELY UNDERSTAND YOU!!!!!!!!

Let us grieve together ๐Ÿ˜ฆ ๐Ÿ˜ฆ
My was speechless after exiting the cinema. End of an era

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18 07 2011
Tophat

I never got into Harry Potter, myself. I think I was too old when the series rolled around… but I do respect the series for helping a generation to actually read books again. As for growing up, well, I haven’t really ever had the feeling that my childhood was over. I always believed if you don’t indulge your inner child every chance you get, you have no right to complain about losing him when you reach middle age.

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18 07 2011
pyrichb

Rupert Grint said in Harry Potter7 part2, ” My best half life”.
But for me I wanna say “My best over half life”

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18 07 2011
audria

WOW! Great blog post. I started reading the Harry Potter books as a young adult, when my stepson brought home the books when he was on holidays. Needless to say I couldn”t put the books down and have been hooked ever since.
When I read the last book, I actually cried when Dumbledore was killed. I am really looking forward to seeing the movie, to see everything coming to life.

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18 07 2011
Patiently Waiting

I know how you feel, just a little bit. I started reading them a year after the first one came out, in ’99. I was nine years old. I’m now twenty. Harry Potter took me through a lot of hard stuff – a divorce, constant moving around, the typical high school drama…I always had a Harry Potter book to come back to. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve reread all of them. My childhood really is at an end.
But it’s not just about Harry. I’m halfway through college, and I feel incredibly old. My little brother is getting ready to start his first year at OSU. I feel like I graduated from HS months ago rather than years. It’s incredible how time flies. It’s so amusing how when we’re little, we want to grow up so badly, but when we grow up, we yearn for the little kid days. It’s an awful, beautiful paradox. Great post, congrats on getting Pressed!

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18 07 2011
Jennifer C

My family and I went to see the last movie this past weekend, and although I was already an adult when Harry Potter began, I felt that same sense of loss…maybe not of my childhood, but for the inevitable diminishing of the Harry Potter “mania” that we have witnessed. Yes, the books will stand the test of time, but the newness of it all will fade…
As a middle and high school English teacher, I have seen how these stories turned reluctant readers into voracious ones. Many would have never attempted so large a book unless there was so much talk and fervor that they had to find out what all the fuss was about. To this day, I am still fascinated and intrigued that a book can have such a dramatic impact in our techy lives…
Hard to imagine life without Harry, Ron, and all the rest. Seems like we have always been waiting for the next movie to come out, and now, there are no more…it’s definitely bittersweet.

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18 07 2011
norrbu

I feel the same way Cassie.

And how about a NOW picture alongside the one when you first started reading the book.

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18 07 2011
wingedcreature

I know exactly what you mean! I feel as though my childhood has ended as well, and it was very bittersweet. But like J.R. Rowling said during the London premiere, Hogwarts will always be there to welcome us home, If you haven’t seen her speech, here’s a link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKXuOj9d5o8

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18 07 2011
bradenbost

It happens to all of us. Just pray that Rowling doesn’t ever decide to tell Harry’s parents’ story with a CG rabbit-lizard and over-the-top fight correography. The only thing worse than letting your childhood officially become “the past” is having it ruined in the name of making money.

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18 07 2011
dani.o

The title alone describes how I feel about the whole situation. I think the Harry Potter experience has such a unique connection to our generation in that it signifies our childhood and growth. The imaginary world was an escape for me and is a place I will sorely miss now that I’m an adult.

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18 07 2011
SuperRobot-INdisguise

I was “forced” to read the first Harry Potter my first semester in college. I was completely annoyed because I was “too good for fiction”. I fell in LOVE after a late night reading it in my… wait for it…. My Little Pony pop tent on my dorm bed (but fiction, no?). Anyway, it was love at first read. At this last midnight showing, I actually heard a lot of “kids” (I’m 29 with an, “I’m old” complex) say they felt as if it was their beginning of adulthood as well. Their statements didn’t hold much water for me then (I was wrapped up in Potter-fever), but as I read your post it began to make sense; you summed it up nicely.

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18 07 2011
aconn464

I had the chance to go to the Harry Potter premiere in New York (with a radio station, not because I’m special) last week and some of the cast and crew spoke to the audience before the movie started. David Yates said that when they did a test screening in Chicago back in April, the most important feedback they got was a girl’s comment who’d written “Goodbye, childhood.”

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18 07 2011
lifenbits

I was an adult when I started reading Harry Potter and never understood why they were on the Children Section. Well, I do understand but it is a great book for adults too. I think we never detach from our childhood. I think the child live in there. And sometimes a book, a movie, a game or a friend get in touch with the child and we can laugh again at life.

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18 07 2011
capnsolarkate

Oh, I couldn’t agree more! I’m even delaying going to see it, as I too will be sad when it’s finally ‘the end’. A great post, you’re not alone!

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18 07 2011
Jolyse Barnett

Thanks for sharing your experience, Cassie. I wrote about Harry Potter today, too! My blog is from a mom’s perspective, however.

I introduced my daughter to HP when she was eight, and we bonded over the series. I cried at the movie as much for the love we share and the wonderful memories these characters have given us, as I did for the actual events in the movie. (Although, I admit to crying for Snape and again at the end, when Harry realizes his fate.)

Thanks again!

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18 07 2011
gaycarboys

We saw in on Imax. As I said last night I could have made the last two movies into one movie about 1.5 hours long. The books must have been a trial!

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18 07 2011
golfharp

Your post really resonated with me. I too read my first HP book when I was in the 8th grade, and I also grew up in MN. What a coincidence! I too spent countless summer hours devouring the latest Rowling books, and yes, I dressed up in all my finest nerdery to attend midnight showings of the HP movies with my friends in high school and college. The end of Harry Potter feels like the end of an era, but I think it hurt even more when the books were finished. The movies have been a nice way to keep HP in my life for so many years after the last book. It’s telling that this final movie – which my husband and I are going to see at the iMax tomorrow night – comes just as I take my first “real job,” move across the country with my new life partner, and start figuring out what’s the difference between a Asset Allocation Fund and Money Market fund. Yes, we’ve grown up, but that doesn’t mean we’ve forgotten how to relax, imagine, escape…into a world of Harry Potter books. That’s what Sundays are for :).

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18 07 2011
Kristen

I feel the same way. I was in 7th grade when the first book came out and now I’ll be getting married in 3 months. It’s a weird feeling to know there won’t be another movie or book but I know I’ll re-read and re-watch the movies all the time.

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18 07 2011
talesofa20yearoldnothing

Harry Potter has literally been with me the majority of my life. I discovered it almost nearly as Sorceror’s Stone was published, I was only seven, but loved reading, and not that it’s finally over, I find myself slightly lost, not only am I no longer considered a child by law, but now it feels as if I lost a childhood friend, which a little silly I suppose since I can always go back and reread the series and rewatch the movies, but something just feels… missing.

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18 07 2011
Phil Ruse

Never grow up – never surrender!

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18 07 2011
Amber Stronach

I must say i am in the same boat as you. I too grew up with harry Potter and now there is a gapping hole in my life. I live in the hope that J.K Rowling gives us all the Prequel and possibly loads more adventures in the Wizarding World

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18 07 2011
Larry & Rebecca Lacy

What a great post! I grew up reading the Chronicles of Narnia. I used to imagine what the books would be like as movies. As I have reread the books as an adult, they take on a different depth than when I was a kid. At the same time, they bring back that feeling that I used to love as I escaped into the magical world – a bit of eternal childhood. So, maybe your childhood isn’t really dead. Maybe you will find it at odd times when you least expect it.

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18 07 2011
frankiejones

I completely understand where you are coming from (I wrote a similar post pre-release of the film, following standing at the UK premiere in the rain!) but seeing the final film was slightly cathartic and I still feel a bit in denial about it all. I know one thing, Harry Potter will stay with me forever and it will certainly be a part of my children’s lives!

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18 07 2011
gojulesgo

GREAT post and congrats on being Freshly Pressed! I know exactly what you mean, both about HP and feeling ‘grown up’. I’m 29 and still not there yet! Maybe when the last Twilight movie comes out… Ha!

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18 07 2011
civiseli

I have twice watched Potter in this week :((((( แƒฐแƒแƒ แƒ˜ โค

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18 07 2011
cupcake2eater

I love Harry Potter even though I am only 13, I’m excited to see the finale because I haven’t seen it yet but the anticipation is killing me.

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18 07 2011
Let's be frank, I'll be Jessica

Awesome!! Really good post!

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18 07 2011
Jodi Stone

For me it was sad because when I had finished reading the 7th book, I still had the movies to look forward to. So in a way for me it is an ending, but there is Pottermore to look forward to, so I don’t feel quite so sad about endings.

Each time a new book was scheduled to come out, I would start from the beginning of the series and re-read them all!

For me it was more of a disappointment with the movies, each time a new movie came out I had such anticipation to see those beloved characters and how they grew and from the third movie on I was always disappointed with them.

I thought Part Two was a great movie, but it was not a great movie made from a book, because they changed almost everything.

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18 07 2011
milezaway

A great post, I like the films more so because I think the the writer must have had the most amazing imagination.

As for growing up……. I have peter pan syndrome !

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18 07 2011
oliviaks1331

That is exactly how I feel too. My friends and I have been literally and figuratively crying on each other’s shoulders since it ended. I picked up the first book in second grade and never grew out of them. An amazing series, world, and friend. 3/4 of the world mourn its ending with us.

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18 07 2011
Lauren Zietsman

I’ve been telling people all day that I cried through the entire movie because I felt like it was the death of my childhood. Memories of reading the first book on my twin bed in the basement when I was a wee little ‘un will have to suffice from now on :)…:(

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18 07 2011
patricemj

on, your post made me sad, sorta, but I understand. I think you will regress soon enough and feel like a kid again, but with finality, like the end of the Epic HP movies/book, comes that feeling of , well, loss…like it’s over. It’s really over. In my opinion, it’s actually a really cool and healthy thing to acknowledge these endings in life, because if we don’t we can’t be open to the new things that come our way. Your honesty with yourself and with others is a gift. Thanks for sharing.

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18 07 2011
Eva McCane

i’m headed to the theatre tonight and can’t wait! i’ve heard nothing but rave reviews. thanks for sharing!
http://www.icouldntmakethisshitup.wordpress.com

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18 07 2011
TheEverydayMuser

It’s not the death of my childhood. It’ll never be the death of my childhood, because, I’m just going to keep reading all the books and watching all the movies again and again.
I’ve said this on numerous sites and I’m saying it again here –
People are saying the magic ends with this movie.
I dispute that.
For me, the magic will never end, not as long as those who remain are loyal to the series.
A true Harry Potter fan will definitely figure out the meaning of that sentence..
Congratulations on being Freshly Pressed!

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18 07 2011
Exumaii

I know! I can’t believe this epic saga is over. It was definitely worth reading and I wish there was a continuation, perhaps with James’ or Albus’ adventures.

Its the end of an era..but we still have Pottermore to wait for!

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18 07 2011
blastedgoat

Loved your closing lines, they rang true with me as well: “But secretly, I sometimes wish I could go back to my carefree days twelve years agoโ€“back when my biggest worry was finishing Harry Potter before sunrise.”

I find myself in a state of shock and writing about it helps and so does sharing it with fellow ‘nerds’. Thanks for sharing your experience!

Harry Potter does have the power of outlasting many things, even childhood… I’m twenty-five now and I started reading them around age thirteen!

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18 07 2011
Project Couture

I agree completely. I remember trying to read the first Harry Potter book when I was eight. I can’t really remember when I actually started reading them all. But I just fell in love with them and I started going to the midnight premieres since the 6th movie. Except for the last part of the 7th. I had to work. I work with a lot of older people and they made fun of me all night. I can’t imagine something more adult than missing the last part of your childhood because you had to work. Grr. But I’ll go save three bucks and see it in the morning. Adulthood sucks.

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18 07 2011
Em

I know how you feel it was very much something I grew up with, too. I started reading it in Primary school and the last book came out when I was16. Pretty much ever since I started readng it, there’s been something to wait for each year, a new book or movie. I had my 20th birthday in the same week as the movie came out , so it really was like leaving childhood behind. Still, though, I think the books are as readable for adults as children, my father and stepmum love them! And I’ll probably keep reading them from time to time for the rest of my life.

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18 07 2011
The Gaming Hipster

So true, it does feel like the end of an era, and somehow the new upcoming series like Twilight can’t seem to hold a flag to the broad spectrum of appeal held by the Harry Potter series. It is good to feel it end though, however bittersweet. Like a part of childhood can finally go to sleep.

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18 07 2011
A Colorful Commentator

Very well put. I wrote a similar piece a couple of days ago. For me, this feeling came when I finished the 7th novel, but the final movie being released brings back those memories. I saw and related to Harry not just as a child, but as an adolescent and young adult as well; Rowling masterfully captured all of the trials and tribulations that so many people face growing up, and managed to rekindle the feelings for those of us who were past those stages of our lives.

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18 07 2011
The close of a generation. Harry Potter. « Thifty Nifty

[…] is on the front page of wordpress > > > > The Final Harry Potter = The Death of My Childhoodย < < < […]

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18 07 2011
PotterFanForLife

You are defiantly not alone in feeling that way about your childhood. My dad and I (both avid Harry Potter fans) went to every movie, and midnight release for the past 7 years. It has been a big constant for a long time. No other series has captured this many followers or changed this many lives. But when I feel sad about the end of my childhood, I try to remember a phrase my mother would always say, “Don’t be sad that it’s over, be glad that it happened”. When I think of that it comforts me that no matter what happens in life, I was part of this world-wide phenomenon and a follower of the greatest series to date! Hope this helps you as well. Long live Harry Potter!!!

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18 07 2011
Alicia

I grew up with Harry Potter too. ๐Ÿ™‚ I was actually exactly the same age as Harry in the first book when I started reading them. So as each Harry Potter came out, I was the same age as him. I think that helped me relate a lot more with him–because he’s my age… That is if he weren’t a fictional character.

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18 07 2011
i love harry

though i am still in high school, i felt my childhood coming to an end too. i remember being curled up on the couch with my dad reading the first few books to me, until I was old enough to read them by myself. i fell in love. with harry, ron, and hermione. i went to the midnight show as bellatrix, with a beautifully drawn dark mark on my arm. i turned heads. but that hard shell was only a costume. inside i was being torn apart. at the end of the movie, my friend who was in a different theater asked me, “how many times did you cry?” twice.

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18 07 2011
sdelaina

I love Harry Potter anyway Harry Potter is the perfect boy. I wish that I was MRS. HARRY POTTER!! He is my not-so-secret crush! I think that he would be the perfect boyfriend! He is sweet, caring, HOT, and a really perfect boy! I love him. Did I mention that I LOVE HIM!

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18 07 2011
Melissa

I agree with every word you said, except that this was a great movie. I didnยดt like it at all.

But I also feel that my childhood is over. Itยดs been a weird feeling.

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18 07 2011
bonkasaurus

I am still in denial! Even though i read all the books the last movie was like reading it again for the first time. I am going to miss it. I even blogged about it the day before it came out in theaters. Best story ever!

-Bianca at http://theinbetweengirls.wordpress.com/2011/07/13/the-end-of-a-magical-era/

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18 07 2011
Jess

I was about your age when the series came out – going into 9th grade – but the big difference is I didn’t even consider reading it. In fact, I didn’t pick up my first Harry Potter book until I was 26 years old and while I absolutely adored the series and the accompanying films, I feel a little cheated out of a Harry Potter childhood. While I’m sure people will be talking about Harry Potter for years to come, I really only had two good years of Harry Potter hype to be a part of. I’m glad I jumped on the bandwagon, but I sometimes feel like I jumped on a bit too late.

http://thelastmuggle.com

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18 07 2011
MEly.

Harry Potter is awesome. ๐Ÿ™‚

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18 07 2011
comingeast

I’m sad the movies have ended, too. I also read and reread all the books, though I don’t own any. I always borrowed them from my students. I’m sixty-two and I will miss the escape they afforded. Not only are the tales marvelous, Rowling is a tremendous writer. The stories are timeless, so I think I will buy a set of Harry Potter books for me and start reading them all over again. Congratulations on being Freshly Pressed! Loved your picture.

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18 07 2011
gykolette

no joke this makes me want to cry

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18 07 2011
Teacher Girl

I wrote a very similar post! I think our generation is definitely feeling the loss =(

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18 07 2011
jotheturtle

the saddest part was when tonks and remus died barely touching hands u could here the whole theatere crying and sobbing there eyes out :((

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18 07 2011
Nessa Metharam

The first thing that popped inside my head when I realized that it’s actually the last Harry Potter was ‘ooh my goodness. Good bye childhood. Hello adult life’

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18 07 2011
jotheturtle

saw the movie on midnight premier i was sobbing like a little kid this blog was almost as powerful as neville’s speech when harry “died”

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18 07 2011
gotoffs

That’s what’s so beautiful about Harry Potter. If most of your childhood consist of Rowling’s world, you’ll be able to re-visit your childhood no matter how old or far you are from it. The books/films are, in a sense, your very own time machine.

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18 07 2011
silvaer

Cry-cry-cry and now I worry about my own reaction to watching the movie… (Why do I have to wait? xD)

And in the end, I think we’re all, those who read and watch Harry Potter, losing something, ending something. But you know what? We’re still there to keep it in the world – it’s never going to really die. Some things are just so powerful that it can’t be squashed, pushed away, hidden.

Thank you, JKR, Harry Potter, magic.

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18 07 2011
freenewsforyou

I totally agree. Harry Potter is one of those important stages in my life, as in many others life’s.

Thank you.

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19 07 2011
Chanel

Beautiful post, and you’re definitely not alone. I’ve reread the books several times each and my love for them grows. I’ve seen the Deathly Hallows Part 2 twice in the last week, and yes I love it, though I was incredibly sad to have it end ๐Ÿ˜ฆ I like PotterFanForLife’s comment above: “Donโ€™t be sad that itโ€™s over, be glad that it happened”.
(I created a Harry Potter feast on my blog if you’re interested in consoling yourself with butterbeer!)

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19 07 2011
Liz

I’m with you! I still haven’t gone to the final film for fear of knowing it’s over. It wasn’t until high school that Harry and I really became acquainted, but it’s been a love affair to say the least. Thanks for sharing!

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19 07 2011
Lacey

I just wrote a very similar post! Completely agree!

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19 07 2011
KP

I was traumatized by the fact that it’s over. Gotta relive it through the DVD’s ;0)
Great post!!

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19 07 2011
dreamsanddoodles

It’s not really over. It will always be there to welcome you home. ๐Ÿ™‚

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19 07 2011
myfilthyroom

I really hope Rowling would come up with another masterpiece. ๐Ÿ˜€

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19 07 2011
MrsHix

wonderful post… it’s so true on how we feel as though all of a sudden our childhood is over in one fell swoop.

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19 07 2011
Sara Rassler

You are definitely not alone. Thank you for sharing this post. I’m 19 and my childhood has technically been over for over a year, but this really signified the end of my childhood. The movie made me cry, but I sobbed at the end as I sat watching the credits…simply because it is over. I’ve been listening to Wizard Rock and spending hours on Tumblr (where I follow many Potterheads) to try to cope with my Post Potter Depression that frequently brings tears to my eyes and makes me wonder where my childhood went.

In short, I know how you feel.

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19 07 2011
Old Jules

I recall feeling somewhat the same way about Roy Rogers and Gene Autry. All I can tell you is that it will pass and you won’t like what replaces it nearly so well.

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19 07 2011
Kat

Minnesotans unite!

I get migraines from the big screen, so once the final movie comes out on DVD, I plan on marathon-watching the entire series from start to finish.

But that line about finishing before sunrise, I almost burst into tears. I remember reading the 7th book in my lofted bed at the fraternity house I was living at for the summer while all of my other friends were out at the bar.

Our childhoods may have ended, but here’s to growing up with The Boy Who Lived – no other generation of kids will EVER get to do that the same way we did.

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19 07 2011
Judy Marie Santiago

Now this is really touching. I got misty eyes right after reading this. Too bad, I have yet to watch the HP movie… But as you’ve said, I might prolong it so I could have more time to enjoy my childhood. Haha! Kidding aside, you’re not alone! ๐Ÿ™‚ Harry Potter and the rest of the world–fiction or non-fic is beside you in this transition to adulthood. Let’s enjoy every second of it. ๐Ÿ˜‰

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19 07 2011
Rebirth of the Ex-reader

I felt my childhood die too!!!! ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

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19 07 2011
The Final Harry Potter = The Death of My Childhood. (via Cassie Moore’s Blog) « Live&Learn

[…] Leave a comment I just got home, after seeing the final Harry Potter movie with my husband. It was, in a mere word, epic. Truthfully, it was probably one of the best movies I've ever seen. The characters came alive in this movie, and the contrast between good and evil was so strong that it gave me the chills. The humor was perfect, the action magnificent, and the conclusion was a tear-jerker. I loved every moment. Heck, even the cynical reviewers at Rotten Tomat … Read More […]

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19 07 2011
Fox

You’re not alone in feeling this way. All over facebook, each of my friends are declaring that their childhoods have died after they saw the last movie. I’ve not yet seen it- heck, I still have to see 6 and the first part of 7. But (if I may share my own bit) something hit me the night it premiered: I’ve never seen a Potter Premier. And never will I. I stayed behind while my friends left; I had work early in the morning and I couldn’t be tired for it. The responsible adult where job comes first, college bills first, ect. I sympathize with your pining for childhood. Life waits for no one, so we cannot drag our feet. Thank you for sharing your thoughts ๐Ÿ™‚

-Fox

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19 07 2011
Jennie

I had the EXACT same response! I was standing in line with my husband, surrounded by teenagers, and I looked at him and said, “So, this is how a childhood dies…” Kudos for putting it into words for me.

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19 07 2011
Auspicious Wedding Dates

Glad you enjoy the final movie ๐Ÿ™‚

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19 07 2011
Cherszy

I grew up with Harry Potter as well. I was just around 8 when the first installment came out. I was only a year younger than Daniel Radcliffe himself. Good times, really. I can’t believe that after a decade, our generation is now all grown up. We are the Harry Potter generation, I guess. And like you, i feel extremely sad that it has finally come to an end. Those were sweet 10 years which I don’t think I’ll ever forget. The story, the characters, and the spells have all earned a place in my heart. It ia truly something special.

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19 07 2011
sfweez

Oh I had the same reaction–only the final HP film didn’t herald the end of my own childhood, but that of my kids: http://sfweez.wordpress.com/

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19 07 2011
ennospace

anyway, you’ll have many nice memory about your childhood!

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19 07 2011
literatelibran

Did you think the movie was as good as the book? I’ve just watched it, and the last one I watched/read was the first of each… Debating whether to read or watch the rest.

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19 07 2011
cookiecaper

I truly understand how you feel and know exactly what you mean. I think my true reasoning for crying through most of the last two films are because it’s really over. I feel like this piece of my life that is so precious to me has come to an end. But at the same time, I am eager to grow, as Harry did before our eyes. I look forward to not only pass this amazing story of adventure, love, mischief and magic down to the children I hope to have, but to crack it open myself again to feel the way I did in 7th grade.

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19 07 2011
sylviahubbard1

you took the words right out of my mouth!

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19 07 2011
Jam the Awesome

I love the Harry Potter series as well… and i read all the books in 1 month… and it has seriously become something that is very important to me. When i started the series… i would read all the time. In the car… (even though i got car sick), at home, at camp, at bedtime, at school and at parties. Some times i was so caught up in the Harry Potter series that i was more interested in the book than what people had to say at the party! ๐Ÿ™‚ I have found alot of book series that I really like…. and re-read constantly… but i find that the Harry Potter beats them all… EASY! Last year.. i fell in love with the none other than Harry Potter. And is my favorite book series of all time.

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19 07 2011
katelyngarlow

I feel the EXACT same way! I have been telling people that my childhood is over, and that I actually have to “grow up” now. I started reading Harry Potter in the third grade, and I JUST graduated from college. So not only have I been hit by the graduation part, and the holy shit I have no idea what I want to do with my life part, but Harry Potter has come to it’s end. It will forever live in my heart, and I will always re-read and re-watch the movies, but the waiting has ended, there is no more excitement of “what’s next.” When the credits started rolling I actually started crying… Go me. But I was in such denial/awe/sadness over the whole situation that I was overwhelmed. There were some 13 year old girls sitting beside me wanting to know why I was crying, they just didn’t get it. To a lot of people, like you and I, the Harry Potter series was much more than a bunch of books and movies; it was our childhood, it was what got us through a lot of things and has been the one constant in our lives. I know exactly how you feel. I still cannot believe it is finally “over.”

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19 07 2011
Karen

Enjoyed your blog & can totally relate! I’m a middle-aged mom, just as forlorn as you are about the end of this epic…..at least on the screen. I’m grateful for the lessons of life and love that J.K. imparted to her readers, simply by being honest about the unpredictability and often harshness of life. I’m a better person for having read Harry Potter

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19 07 2011
pattyabr

You’ve been FP! Congrats! http://pattyabrdotcom.com

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19 07 2011
Matt

I met my wife on a Potter fanforum, which was a completely chance meeting. We talked and the rest, as they say, is history.
If it wasn’t for Harry Potter we wouldn’t be where we are today.
We share the same feelings that you do – A part of us has gone. We’ve grown up reading Harry Potter and the road ahead feels alone and Potterless.

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19 07 2011
Mandy being Mandy

Stumbled on your blog and I love the post! I love Harry Potter and was a little overwhelmed that it was really over. It’s been such a great ride. Your post echoed a lot of what I felt about it coming to an end.

P.S. Best of luck with all your ministry work (my husband is a preacher…you have a tough job!).

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19 07 2011
Tracy

WOW, you took the words right out of my mouth. I’m totally there with you, Cassie. I started reading HP the summer after 8th grade, too, and I can pretty much relate to every event you outlined thereafter (minus working at the theme park, you lucky duck!) so please don’t feel alone. Sigh, and now for the withdrawals…

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19 07 2011
lazyllama27

I feel so lucky to be the generation that grew up with Harry Potter. It became such a huge part of my life that sometimes I feel sad for kids now, who have no idea what it’s like to grow up with him. My comfort is that Harry will live on forever, because we’ll pass him down to future generations.

I don’t think anything will ever come close to matching my feelings for the series, and I’ll never find something to so beautifully define my chidhood. I, too, feel like this is really the finale of being a kid.

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19 07 2011
The Final Harry Potter = The Death of My Childhood. | Travel to Johor

[…] FreshlyPressed This entry was posted in Kota Tinggi Waterfall and tagged Childhood., Death, Final, Harry, Potter. Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL. « TR2963 – Johor, Malaysia […]

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19 07 2011
Kat

I know exactly how you feel…I started reading these books in 5th grade, watched the movies and went to almost every midnight premiere! I would stay up til the sun came up reading the books and re-took them out of the library whenever possible!
I am sad that it’s finally come to an end..no more movies to look forward to..or books…all left up to our own imagination what keeps happening…

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19 07 2011
elizabethraine

I was 11 when I read the first book, and proceeded to read each book when it came out, close in age to the characters- when the last came out, I was 19, having just finished my freshman year of college. I already felt the end though, because I haven’t wanted to see the movies since the fourth one, which to me was a train wreck.
I keep hearing good things about these last two, though, so maybe I will see them after all.

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19 07 2011
taraebrowne

My moment of adulthood hitting home: when I looked at a coworker and knew she was expecting because I remembered having the feelings that matched the look she wore…a month before she announced her pregnancy.

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19 07 2011
Ji Yoon

I can symphathize with you entirely, as a “Potterhead”, even though I’m only 14. I started reading Harry Potter at the age of 8, just when I was old enough to understand it. It easily became my entire world, an essential part of my identity. After finishing the seventh book in 2007, devastated by the end of the series, I was able to cheer up thanks to the remaining 3 or 4 movies I had yet to watch. Now, since the big finale, the end of a whole decade of HP movies, has come, everyone who’s grown attached to the series must feel like a major part of their lives are over. You couldn’t have written out the feeling of facing “The Death of My Childhood” better. I’m sure my emotions about this are nothing compared to yours, but I, just entering my teenage years, am just as sorry to see my magical pre-teen years go.

Loved your post! Congratulations on being on FP!

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19 07 2011
Vinlite

I can kind of see what you are trying to say.

I have yet to see the movie. I keep putting it off because it would mean the end of something in my life.. something which was always there to fall back upon when things were not going good or when things were great.

I read the first four books when I was 8 or 9 and from then on there was no looking back.

I know that not seeing the movie won’t change a thing and I’ll still grow up but still..one can hope…

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19 07 2011
patricknav

Great Post! I was actually thinking about this while I was watching the trailers.
Most of my childhood (I was 10 when the first book came out) was spent reading the books/watching the films. It’s definitely disheartening to see the end of HP, alas, it’s always something that can take us back.

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19 07 2011
deutschzuid

Although I am a bit older than the HP generation, I fully understand the melancholy you experience. I am sure it’s something that’s shared by many people including myself… of growing up and realizing it’s time to leave your childhood behind.

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19 07 2011
themaltesetiger

I have a different Harry Potter experience to report. I was introduced to this franchise about 2 (or maybe 3) years ago when my g/f now wife dragged me to see Half Blood Prince. I was never so confused by a movie in my life. Now after being fully caught up on the storyline, and attending a midnight showing of Deathly Hallows, I’m experiencing the same melancholy that you’ve described here. I discovered Harry Potter at the age of 20 and I enjoyed it just as much as I would have at the age of 12. I don’t think our childhood really has to die as long as we can find enjoyment in the small things.

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19 07 2011
jandeandeocampo

Harry Potter here since the third grade. Now I’m eighteen, and I am feeling the blow especially hard. Eighteen and college are big steps I’m adjusting to, and the end of HP as well?

The past 11 years have just been magical and, growing up, I needed that magic. Talking now as someone who reads and writes with literature/academia influences, Jo is up there with Hemingway and Kafka and all those writerly writers, for me.

Anyway, I know how you feel. Best thing to do is always carry a wand.

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19 07 2011
palmtreez

I totally agree and I think you said it perfectly. I suggest reading “name of the wind” to help you distract yourself. ๐Ÿ™‚

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19 07 2011
Aaron

Wow, I’m even more desperate to see the movie now; but I kinda want to prolong the wait, keep reading the books and make it last, lol. I don’t want Harry Potter to be over!

I’m about to be a 23-year-old man…I’m a day trader (individual trader of stocks & financial securities) and a software developer…I have to pay bills, I own a home, land and a Mercedes-Benz, and I’m actually financially supporting my mother temporarily…my real childhood ended when I was about 16 — my parents split and I was out on my own, forced to work in a food warehouse freezer from 4am to 6pm… Harry Potter was with me then, an escape from the hard times. Even though I’m blessed to have these things now, that I’ve gone somewhere in life, they all add stress I never knew when I was a kid. I think it’s even more troubling to have great things than having nothing sometimes… I also think the hardships I’ve faced to get here have left some scars and callouses on me… I’ve got the thick skin and hardened resolve of one who has known suffering from an early age… I’m typically stoic, reserved and even a bit withdrawn. I don’t wear my heart on my sleeve… Yet I am not ashamed to say I LOVE Harry Potter — even if it draws a crazy look from a few people! Reading it or watching the movies brings me right back to 7th grade when I had no bills, financial risk, worries and didn’t know what a “portfolio”, “asset allocation scheme” or “production schedule” was. The end of Deathly Hallows (the book) can almost bring tears of excitement to my eyes, and make me remember exactly how being a kid felt. For that, I applaud Rowling…a truly magnificent author…an artist. She has permanently blown away the gap between children’s literature and “regular” adult literature. She deserves a spot in the hall of fame right next to the greats like Tolkein and George Orwell.

I feel bad for anyone who’s never read Harry Potter from beginning to end. Many of my friends (other guys) thought it was a “nerd book” or they were too “tough” for it — they’ve even cracked jokes on me for being a Potter fanboy, lol. But it blows their minds that I can walk up to a beautiful girl and ask her “Do you like Harry Potter?” and she smiles and says “Oh my god! Yes, I love it!”. ๐Ÿ˜‰ So I can bear the taunting of fellow male friends about reading so-called “kids’ books”, lol. They’re the ones who’ve missed out on one of the greatest and most epic stories ever told. I think that you can’t call yourself “well-read” if Harry Potter isn’t checked out on your list…that just means you’ve really missed out on something great!

I’m wondering how I will feel after seeing the final movie. Reading the last book didn’t kill me because I had the movies to look forward to. But I worry I might feel just like the author…almost devastated, lol. I don’t want to lose the magic of experiencing the world of Harry Potter in new ways. In fact, the author and software developer within me is screaming “DO SOMETHING!”. I’ve honestly been day dreaming about writing my own fantasy story or prototyping a Harry Potter video game…in fact, I have a concept I think could be a spectacular game, better than any that have been made. These thoughts torture me in my idle time, lol. Maybe I’ll give it a shot someday. But right now, I’m finishing Deathly Hallows again and I’ve got a new movie to go see! I can’t wait, but I admit, I worry that I’ll be a bit sad that it’s over too!

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20 07 2011
nathoagland

I didn’t read the last book until earlier this year. I had put it off because of all the things that had gone on the past few years of my life. Its hard sometimes to remember to be young and to hold on to the joy that you have in something so much. I cried throughout the entire book. I finally allowed myself to get to know the cast of the movies and even started watching more interviews of Rowling. Many made tear up as she talked about her pains as a writer and what it took to write certain parts of the story not to mention the end. I applaud you for being able to hold your ground with your friends and your love of the story. I have been teased and often debated with or just simply harrassed by some of my best friends because of religious views more than anything else. I also must say that is the best pickup line I have ever heard! Haha If any guy came up to me and asked me about Harry Potter as an opening line I think I would be left speechless. There are so many things I feel, that we have to look forward to with this series. I think that although the story itself has ended, new things are around the corner and I think it will take the help of everyone who has an ounce of resource and creativity to continue the legacy.

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19 07 2011
Mr. Virtuoso

yup….harry potter had been a constant companion. I cant exactly express the good vs evil thing but it was awesome and fascinating regardless. I mean, i remember reading Order of Phoenix a whole day. I got the book at 3 in the noon and i couldn’t sleep the day till i came to the last page of it….Everytime it happens there was a feel of “It was an epic!!”…everytime. Nice post, you bacame voice of many hp fans all over!!

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19 07 2011
Leah

Wonderful post! Although I was not a kid when the Potter books came out, I can’t wait to relive the wonderment of childhood and mystery as I read them to my daughter as she grows older. Maybe that’s why we actually have children — to experience all those great things once again. Congrats on being freshly pressed!

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19 07 2011
Catie Harrell

I uncapped my filter and told my husband that I felt I had just ended a relationship with my HS boyfriend. He looked at me like I had lost it.
It is the end of an era, that personally I really never wanted to end.
You are not alone!

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19 07 2011
mkeeffer

The end of an era….and fortunately everyone can read the books again and see the movies a second, third or….well, you know.

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19 07 2011
With Harry Potter being ended, Does it mean anything to you? | AIS Journal

[…] post, a particular post in the Freshly Pressed caught my attention. It’s titled “The Final Harry Potter = The Death of my Childhood“. I read the post, and I totally understand the point of view that blogger has written the […]

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19 07 2011
HarryPotterLovers

ahhh so sweet. loved ur piece — and so many can relate. we just wrote about it from a humor perspective — maybe it’ll help ๐Ÿ˜‰
Diary of a Harry Potter Addict
http://anonymouspotteraddict.wordpress.com
& it just came out in paperback today
https://createspace.com/3626210

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19 07 2011
creativeconfessions

I grew up with Harry Potter too, and I’ve always been a crazy fan. I watched the final movie on the 15th and totally relate to how you’re feeling now. Thanks for sharing this.

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19 07 2011
lehamitea

I actually teared a little reading this.

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19 07 2011
lia

The final of Harry Potter is something personal indeed. Never been read an epic like that. The books are overwhelmed me. I was 13 years old back then when I read my first book of Harry Potter. I couldn’t take it aside before finishing it.

Something that makes me strong to face my world now is holding on onto the nimbus 2000 and catch the golden snitch!!

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19 07 2011
jasonbee98

I know childhood is a lot of fun, but adulthood has its own surprises too. It’s fun planning ahead for yourself. It makes you feel more of in control unlike when we were kids. While childhood memories are one’s most cherished possessions, nobody’s stopping us from making new ones as adults. Live life to the fullest! ๐Ÿ™‚

Be excited for there are more memories to come! ๐Ÿ™‚

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19 07 2011
Elaina Hall

What a lovely post. I feel like one of the other posters, I am 43, and I love the series just like my 18-year-old daughter! I have found pictures of the cast as they were in the first HP film, and I have seen the latest pics of them — it is a bitter-sweet ending. All I can say is, “Thank you JK Rowling.” I am a teacher and a mother, and she has made readers out of so many. That is the greatest gift of all.

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19 07 2011
The Final Harry Potter = The Death of My Childhood. | Travel to Selangor

[…] FreshlyPressed This entry was posted in Selangor and tagged Childhood., Death, Final, Harry, Potter. Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL. « ๆˆ‘ๆƒณๆˆ‘ๆ‰“็ ดไบ†ๆˆ‘็š„้ชจๅคด้€ป่พ‘ […]

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19 07 2011
Vix @ LittleMissEverything

Brillant post! I was older than you when I first read HP – I think about 17 and the first four books were already out but still at Uni, I queued at midnight for Book 5 and like you it really is the end of an era now all the books and films are over. But as you say it will always be a part of my life. Maybe one day we’ll read it to our children!

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19 07 2011
thefelinegirl

This is a wonderful post, and you put into such elegant words what I felt as I caught the last Harry Potter movie. And yes, I too grew up with Harry Potter, (or maybe they grew up with me) so I understand perfectly what you mean about the death of one’s childhood.

When they fast-forwarded to when they grew up, I felt as if I had grown up as well. It was surreal.

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19 07 2011
the island traveler

I wasn’t planning to watch the final movie but after reading your post, it made me reconsider. I admire your passion for the movie.

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19 07 2011
honestdodger

The end of Harry Potter left me in despair. The longing for a new movie and book to come out had always possessed a little corner at my heart, and its end left a sore, empty hole.

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19 07 2011
Amir

It was also part of my childhood too but then i suddenly grew up. By reading your blog now i remember my fights with my brothers, over watching harry potter.
Childhood is one of the greatest blessing of Almighty God.
But now i am young doing business. So no time for Cinema. But i will watch the last part on DVD. As soon as they release it.

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19 07 2011
The Black Beauty Fanatic

Wow! Reading this post and I feel it’s so true. You really hit the nail on the head. I couldn’t figure out why I was so sad after watching the final HP movie, and now I think I know why. No one really prepares you for adulthood, its like one day after college and bam! It hits you. I started reading Harry Potter when I was 14…and its always been something I looked forward to. I can’t believe its been 12 years….sigh.

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19 07 2011
SaniAgung

OMG.. nice post.

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19 07 2011
sinthanai saaral - drizzling thoughts

unfortuantely i have never had a connection with harry potter books or movies no matter how hard I tried. But i knew this last movie will be a teary end for millions of people who had grown on this books.

You blog captures it perfectly. all i can say is sorry. even harry potter had to grow up one day right. so atleast u r not alone in it.may be even harry potter feels the same way.. so grow older with him as your adult friend now ๐Ÿ™‚

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19 07 2011
sinthanai saaral - drizzling thoughts

and how does it feel to be on the word press freshly pressed page? congratulations ๐Ÿ˜€

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19 07 2011
marlowesnymph

I saw the movie the morning that it opened, and I can’t believe it’s over either. After the credits rolled I sat there and I just thought, “the books, the movies, the whole world is just over?” Needless to say, I cried for nearly the whole film. It’s all so heart-breaking.

So many people can identify with what you’ve posted because it speaks to a generation. Congrats on fp! This was a good one.

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19 07 2011
In Western Europe The Grass is Juicy

What a pity Harry Potter ended. I an really sad, but soon sonething as cool as Harry Potter will come. But still those movies and books are fantastic.

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19 07 2011
uchit07

Harry Potter is an epic there is no denying it. I also felt very sad when it finished the legacy of the chosen one.

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19 07 2011
An Idealist Thinker

I started with the 5th Harry Potter book when I was on my first job after college and got totally hooked on to it. Went back to start from the first one. So, I truly looked forward to EVERY single h.p. movie that came out. But the last 2 movies (including this last of the last one) disappointed me. The books are SOoo much better !!

But I liked reading your version of growing up with Harry. It is terrible to know that we won’t be seeing harry, ron n hermoine again. I can understand how you are feeling.

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19 07 2011
karlao

Cassie,
I was wanting to write a post very similar to this because I’m feeling the same way. Totally post-potter depressed. I think it’s great that you have written your thoughts down. It clarifies how you really feel about things and I love that you are honest and open about it.

I did read something the other day that did make me feel a little better however and maybe it will help you too:

“Don’t cry because it’s over. Smile because it happened.”

Your childhood will now become something you treasure and reminisce about every day because childhood is truly beautiful and unique in its own way. Like every stage of life is. Even the one you are in now.

I know it is hard (believe me I know) but the memories you make in your adult life will reflect the person you have become because of the love you have for Harry Potter. Now, forever and always.

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19 07 2011
livinglearningeating

I wasn’t really into the movies, but I miss the books!

I want a new series with the same globally-unifying cult appeal! We need another JK Rowling ๐Ÿ™‚

Or…could JK Rowling just write another awesome series? That would work. ๐Ÿ˜›

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19 07 2011
tinkerbelle86

im trying to get the courage to go and see it, sad times!!

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19 07 2011
An EPIC Weekend « Welcome to The Lady's Blog โ™ฅ

[…] “But secretly, I sometimes wish I could go back to my carefree days twelve years ago-back when my biggest worry was finishing Harry Potter before sunrise.”ย -Cassie Mooreย ๐Ÿ™‚ […]

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19 07 2011
free data recovery softwares

Harry potter is really a very good movie. All the series of this movie is i9mpressive and shows the victory of the good on the evil. Thanks for sharing with us your experience. it is nice to read.

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19 07 2011
lotuschocolate

We all miss Harry. But no worries, the child in you never dies. Try munching a chocolate bar and the time machine will surely take you back to sweet memories ๐Ÿ™‚

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19 07 2011
Christine Bukania

Interesting take on growing up

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19 07 2011
~icide « ersatz esoterica

[…] post is prompted by this one, entitled “The Final Harry Potter – The Death of my Childhood, which from my recent Facebook homepage and Twitter stream, seems to be a fairly common […]

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19 07 2011
CHRISTINA RAS HOUR

that` s sad to know but the good thing is.you grew with them..:)) you are part of the HP history..

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19 07 2011
Lianne Todd

We started reading the Harry Potter books to our oldest when she was 8, and now she’s 19. I understand your melancholy completely only from a different perspective – my own children are almost grown up. I’m so grateful for J.K. Rowling and the timing of her work! There will never be anything quite like this again, I’m sure. But I think none of us will have to leave our childhood behind as long as we continue to enjoy stories of friendship and bravery and magic, and share them with our own children and grandchildren.

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19 07 2011
thotspopping

Besides all the holy books that the world has, there are these 7 books that are sacred enough to be bowed down to. I have read and lived every moment and have enjoyed it in the movies with each of them taking my breath away. I haven’t yet watched the last part but I’m sure it will make me emotional and nostalgic but all the more happy.

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19 07 2011
Kimberley

Great post. I started reading the series with my kids when my oldest son was 10 before the “craze’ took over. Watching the final movie was poetic for me, as well. My nest just emptied. Seems fitting to close the door on the series and move right on into this new phase of my life.

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19 07 2011
callypsomystique

I agree with you completely. I began watching HP when I was 11 and im 21 now and Its been an amazing few years. I went to see it with my husband yesterday too and I felt like I was literally in the movie. Just don’t lose the kid in you and keep the hope alive. Hogwarts will still be inside a piece of our hearts. Great blog and thanks for sharing! ๐Ÿ™‚

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19 07 2011
agirlsvoiceโ™ฅ

Harry Potter has been amazing!

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19 07 2011
marysuefixer

Thankfully, the best part about a book is you can always go back and visit Hogwarts. I turned 20 recently and my parents thought it was so funny that I wouldn’t let them wish me happy birthday. I wasn’t ready to be an adult, for all that I’ve taken care of myself like one for the past two years, that I’ve traveled abroad alone (now) 3 times over, that I’ve gotten on planes by myself, held a steady job, and basically made my own life for a while. I just didn’t want to have the responsibility.

One of the best things I’ve noticed is that the friends from your childhood favorites don’t grow up, and they don’t ask you to either. If you ever want to be a kid again, even for the span of an hour, you can crack open the first book and wish that you had a Hogwarts letter coming.

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19 07 2011
giancarlo โ™ฅ cinnamoroll;]

Me? Iโ€™m feeling really sad that I donโ€™t have HP film to look forward anymore. Yeah! It really is the death of my childhood. I grew up with HARRY, RON and HERMiONE. Since then I learned to love them and keep them in my heart. Well, every beginning has an end, so I guess, thatโ€™s just it. End! All I could say is โ€œthank you to the real wizard behind Harry Potter, Maโ€™am J.K. ROWLiNG, for giving me a childhood that was full of magic. Harry and friends would forever stay in my heart.

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20 07 2011
NeonPinkSheep

Well put! Cheers!!

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19 07 2011
dennisfinocchiaro

I totally agree. I actually wrote a little piece about MY experience (or rather, adventure) seeing the midnight Harry Potter show! What fun. Sorry to hear about your childhood! ๐Ÿ˜‰

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19 07 2011
Harry Potter « |

[…] noble traditions and principles. In short, Harry grows up through a process of developing a home and responsibilities to it. He faces Voldemort surrounded by those he loves, those who have helped […]

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19 07 2011
Brian Brown

Very thoughtful post. I think that idea of home actually gets at part of why we chose Harry, as opposed to other books, to identify with so deeply. I just wrote a post on a similar theme:

http://humanepursuits.wordpress.com/2011/07/18/harry-potter/

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19 07 2011
prevodnasrpski

one whole generation lived on this series but do not think that it will end on this. As soon as you forget about HP there will be another great series to enjoy

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19 07 2011
crimsonlocks

Oh yes, I understand what you mean, even though I’m now 37. But Harry Potter has been such a huge part of my life for several years now, and it seems there has always been something to look forward to, and now it’s over. I cried when the credits rolled and all the way home. I still haven’t even wanted to talk about it that much with anyone because it is such a personal experience for me. Most of my friends would just laugh at me anyway because most are not fans and think it’s just silly to get so wrapped up in stories. They just don’t understand, and I feel sorry for them.

At least we have Pottermore to look forward to. I guess that’s something. :o)

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20 07 2011
An Idealist Thinker

Wow! Its great to hear that we do have something to look forward to..

Please tell me more.. what IS ‘ Pottermore ‘ ?

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19 07 2011
K.K.

Yes, this is just one of the sign signified the end of our childhood. DOn’t be so pessimistic, a movie doesn’t mean the entire of our life, smile up, getting old is all we have to face. We can learn to be mature !

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19 07 2011
Niarrow

Something was missing, rite? Our valueable part to growing until like this was missing. Never think what movie would be HP’s rival.

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19 07 2011
Aleisha McCuiston

I cried at the very start of the movie. That was it. The last time I would ever see a new harry potter movie. And it blows. I’ve been looking for a new book series to get into but nothing has truly captured me yet. I use to laugh at ‘star wars’ fans but now I understand: it’s a book series that defines you at a point in your life. I still to this day wish I could use a wand ๐Ÿ™‚

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19 07 2011
mastalife

I feel a little of the same melancholy. I haven’t followed harry Potter since it started but I became hooked later in life, just the same. Everytime a new movie was out and seen, we began to discuss the next movie and wait and wait for it to show it’s face. It was a past time that is no more. There are no more movies to wait for and discuss.
The actors no doubt will move on and will eventually no longer be dubbed with the “Harry Potter” tag. The only thing we have left is rereading and rewatching. : (

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19 07 2011
changeoursociety

Watched it today.Have never been into the potters until my friend (who by the way has it bad for Rupert)made me watch them-for the past 2 years it has been growing on me so much that when I saw the credits I made a stunning (not really) realisation. Harry Potter always was and always will be better than Twilight in my heart.I’m not one of those obsessed fans for Twilight-it’s HUGELY overrated but I like it just Harry Potter is different it doesn’t have cheap copies and it doesn’t have depressing movies.

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19 07 2011
johnshub

I can’t help but relate to this.

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19 07 2011
eva626

i just love the series! but how they made the end could have been better…i felt like they made the last two minutes in such a rush

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19 07 2011
britishfangirl

I began reading the books in 4th grade and now I am about to begin my third year in college….its amazing how fast time flew, I can still remember the first time I read the book and more importantly I remember waiting for the next book to come out every two years. I cried my eyes out the last hour and half in the theater and I feel the end of my childhood is near (it will not end until the Hobbit comes out though!)

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19 07 2011
goldabyss

Harry Potter will be in our hearts forever and ever. Our childhood is not dead ๐Ÿ˜‰

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19 07 2011
doctorwhofan98

I’ve read all the books, and it was sad finishing the last one. And I watched all the films, and it was sad finishing the last one. But the especially sad thing about the last movie was that it is the last Harry Potter thing ever. Nothing Harry Potter-related to look forward to any more… ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

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19 07 2011
tada86

I understand you, really. I started reading Harry Potter just two years before someone talked about the movies, and now I’ve grown uo, I’m married and I move even to another country!

I wrote something similar too in my blog, you can find it here tada86.wordpress.com/2011/07/17/harry-potter/, it’s in another lenguage, but you can ask somebody to translate it :)!

Sorry for my english but I can’t practice it where I live

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19 07 2011
newsy1

I saw an interview on Oprah with J.K. Rowling and she too said the final book was a very emotional experience. A great heartfelt post, most book lovers all have a coming-of-age-book or series.

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19 07 2011
Anna

Ha ha, I loved your blog! I can hardly believe the HP saga started 10 freaking years ago… although to be honest, I found it terrible then, much as I do now! No offence intended, of course. I just can’t help but look at Harry now and remember the much amusing stammering of, ‘Voldemort… killed… my parents?’ from the first film. ๐Ÿ˜‰

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19 07 2011
somethingnicefornow

I haven’t seen it yet. I am procrastinating because I don’t want it to be over!

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19 07 2011
acrankywomansview

I fall in the unfortunate category of too old to have grown up with HP but, too young to have my kids grow up with it but, I know so many who are having your same feelings. . .it really in an end of an epic phenomenon and I fully expect to cry like a baby at the end of the movie. . .having not seen it yet- THANK YOU for not including a spoiler;)

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19 07 2011
dearestwords

One word: Emotional.

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19 07 2011
Harry Potter « must be a dreamer

[…] The Final Harry Potter = The Death of my Childhood […]

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20 07 2011
gwatson117

So I just stumbled upon your blog here, and well, I do have to agree with you heavily, because I was in the 6th grade when the books first came into my life. And now, even wanting so badly to see the last of the movies, I don’t want to go because I know that if I do, I will feel the same as you, where did my childhood go? You are not alone in this thought ๐Ÿ™‚

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20 07 2011
ไปฅ่ฏบ

The Final Harry Potter = The Death of My Childhood.

Harry Potter = My Childhood.๏ผŸ

่ฟ™ๅฏนๅ“ˆๅˆฉๆณข็‰น็š„่ฏ„ไปทๅฎžๅœจๅคช้ซ˜ไบ†๏ผŒๆˆ‘ๅ–œๆฌขๅ“ˆๅˆฉๅฐๆ—ถ็š„ๆ ทๅญใ€‚O(โˆฉ_โˆฉ)O~

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20 07 2011
derekberry

I was so… broken up about it. I keep writing blogs that trail back to Harry Potter, too.
The film was so heartbreaking and gut-bursting at the same time, it nearly tore me in half with anticipation/separation anxiety. I sat thinking, it can’t be over can it? No… no. NO!

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20 07 2011
erin

Oh my goodness. My friends and I feel EXACTLY the same way! We read the books and watched the movies and were literally growing up at the same time as Harry Potter was. It’s incredible that it’s all over.. along with our childhoods..

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20 07 2011
thewings

You truly could not have said this better. It feels as if the magic has vanished, something I long thought was impossible. You are not alone.

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20 07 2011
soundscryer

Well put, and totally understandable. Me and my family were equally torn up by the end of it all. But I can personally attest to the fact that, unless you let it, it won’t be the end of your childhood. I came to the books by first reading one chapter a night to my then-8 year old daughter. When my youngest turned 8 six years later, I started over with her. By the time we stood in line together to get the last book, we were able to take turns reading chapters aloud- when we could catch our breath- until the very last page. We’d been looking forward to the movie with both excitement and dread, and felt both elated and then somewhat deflated at the same time when we got to see it twice on the Thursday before it opened. We even dressed up- the entire family, all 10 of us including my parents, my daughters’ grandparents (awesome representations of Dumbledore and McGonnagall)- and had a blast. If I, my now graduated eldest daughter, and even my parents can still celebrate moments like that with such abandon, and my daughters can in turn share these stories with their children (unless I sneak in and read it to them first. . .) then none of us will ever grow old. None of us have to.

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20 07 2011
NeonPinkSheep

I left the theater in a strong storm of denial, mixed with that ‘I can see this happening, but i just can’t feel it, yet.” feeling I get when someone dies. Because that’s really what it feels like, a death in the family.

Harry was there for me in some pretty dark times, and I really don’t know how I would have gotten through without him and Hogwarts.

I don’t know how or why we let literature (and TV and film, and art in general) effect us this way. How is it we can get so deeply involved in fictional characters and events that never happened, that they make us cry? They make us laugh! They fill us with dread and fear, and hope. I think it’s interesting the way we let literature effect us, and we even welcome it with open arms (we’ve all been searching for ‘the next’ Harry Potter, right? Some other story to give our lives some flavor for the time being, to distract us from our own lives, or just something to entertain us, to befriend us for awhile).

Obviously I’m not the only one hurting, and feeling a void, now that Harry Potter is over. And it just fascinates me that we all have that in common. We all felt love for this series, we all found love through it. And I love how we’ve all embraced it, and let it effect us, tear us down and build us up, the way Harry Potter has.

It’s time to move on, but it’s important to hold him in our hearts, as well. A good friend (or a whole Hogwarts crew of them) is hard to find. Let’s celebrate it.

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20 07 2011
trinityofthought

I wasn’t as attached to Harry Potter simply because I didn’t read the books until well after they had been released or get in on the initial releases of the movies until probably the 3rd or 4th. But I definitely felt this way about the LOTR movies. I can totally understand that for many people the end of HP was the end of an era for them. I had to explain this to my Mom the other day.

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20 07 2011
tucsonsongstress

What a sentimental and sweet blog. I had a “Holy cow, I’m old!” moment when I was prescribed my very first pair of glasses recently. Those moments are really a good kick in the pants and very shocking. They seem to come out of nowhere. But don’t fret…there will always be another series just waiting to be written. You write so eloquently that it just might be you!

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20 07 2011
Mostak Mohammad

I really like this blog………….

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20 07 2011
BLOG TOPICS FROM AROUND THE WORLD – THE VIEW TODAY – 20.7.11 « Horiwood's Blog

[…] A tourist shares their view on Boston travels […]

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20 07 2011
leadinglight

I loved Harry Potter as soon as it was introduced and stayed in line for the books as they were released. I went to each movie. It is so sad that we have reached the end of the film spectrum too. Wonder if a TV show is in the works? It won’t be the same on the small screen.

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20 07 2011
Prateek Shrivastava

Wonderful, Simply amazing is that post of yours. Loved it, when I was 11 the first harry potter movie came, its all the cast is nearly of same age as me. I too loved the harry potter as much as do. But as they say, “Great things do not last forever”, and I believe they are not wrong.
Awesome

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20 07 2011
overthatspilledmilk

Oh my. I know exactly what you feel. My heart broke when I finally watched the CBB/ credits. I am madly in love with HP series. How I wish good things stay as it is; as long as you want them to be. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

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20 07 2011
Luiza

Me too. I was sad to see it end too. I am still in denial. It was such a big part of my life and I feel like I can relate more to Harry Potter than I ever did with my own family. It kind of feels like we grew up together, Harry and I. ๐Ÿ™‚ On the other hand, J.K. Rowling did create Pottermore, so I think there might be more to come yet! ๐Ÿ™‚

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20 07 2011
wiangga0409

theres huge difference on how the children in development ; developing ; and under development countries spent their childhood ๐Ÿ™‚
im so sorry about harry ๐Ÿ™‚

thanks so much for sharing and being honest.
cheers.

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20 07 2011
nathoagland

I completely understand this. To talk about the characters as if they were real for a moment, I am the same age as Harry and his friends. i was the same age as them as each book arrived and I too have loved each one and read and reread them. I have felt like a huge part of my childhood has died, the one constant good thing. I didn’t grow up in a great backround, much like Harry, and I always felt a strong connection between these characters. I think its because within each of us is a will to fight for a greater good, and with each of us, we face our own battles. I don’t believe that the story ends with the last book, or the last film. As you said, the story has transended so many things. We will have these stories to share with the generations to come in each of our families, along with our own stories to share that were formed around events and other happenings in regards to the books, films, and more. Right now I am recollecting my copies of the books. I have never owned a full set, let alone hard copies. I have managed to pick up books 2,4, & 7 and the tales of beedle the bard from goodwill but have yet to find the other 4. These will be read again and again for many years to come. Don’t let this be the death of your childhood or make you feel you have to be grownup. Grownups truely are just big kids, and most of the time they’ve forgotten what it means to be childlike at times, to have fun, or just what its like being a kid period. I hope this is encouraging to you, and I hope we can share more of our love for this and other stories sometime.

P.S. I LOVE Peter Pan.

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20 07 2011
Agas Treva

I also love to read Harry Potter …

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20 07 2011
nathoagland

For those of you who have been asking here are a couple of sites to help add to your HP experience, but if you have not finished the series do not go to the second link:

http://www.pottermore.com/

http://www.beyondhogwarts.com/harry-potter/articles/jk-rowling-goes-beyond-the-epilogue.html

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21 07 2011
Mary The Awkward

My friend and I also agreed that we felt like it was the end of our childhoods as well. I woke up feeling depressed and dorky the day after I saw it. It’s been suck a big deal for a large portion of my life that it’s going to be weird when I stop hearing about it so frequently, and when kids from younger generations aren’t as familiar with it.

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22 07 2011
One Hundred & 80 Days

Thank you for your thoughts…unfiltered. Don’t worry, you will always have Harry! Everytime you pick up a book or watch a movie, it will warm your heart and take you right back to that point in your childhood. Books are always best friends.

My 11 year old daughter, is half-way thru the first book. With the second hardbound on its way from Ebay. She has seen the movies, but the book she is in love with. I am so excited for the journey and memories she is about to create. I find her in her little room, curled up with the book on her lap.

As a parent, I love the depth of the characters, and the fact that they are good role models, when that is so hard to find these days.

Best of all, as soon as she is done with that first book…I am going to read it!

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24 07 2011
poisonpearl

It was so sad for me to! I am 18, I have just finished with high school and I am about to go to live on my own, studying in another country. After the end of the movies, I started reading back all the books, but I feel so damn old!

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25 07 2011
livinglearningeating

Haha, same! Which country? That’s awesome, I’m going off to Europe in the fall ๐Ÿ™‚

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25 07 2011
It All Ends | When the time's right

[…] The Final Harry Potter = The Death of My Childhood […]

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30 07 2011
plaitsnponys

Loved the post! i couldn’t agree with you more.. somehow the end of the potter saga has left a dent on many lives..now all that remains are fond memories of its contribution to our childhood..those eager moments of suspense during the climax, the heart wrenching sadness that littered harry’s life…all in all, the end of an era!

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1 08 2011
Princess

I feel the same. I also grew up with these books, they put a magical spell on me. It feels so weird knowing that it’s over now, that this era is finally complete.

Love the way you write!!

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3 08 2011
realanonymousgirl2011

Well thats what rereading and watching the books and movies are for! So you can reminisce.

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27 08 2011
Sara Yori

Harry Potter is the greatest, the novels, the book, and the imagination behind it. I have lived my whole childhood with Harry Potter beside me every step of the way, ever since I was 10. It’s so strange because there won’t be another movie next year, or another novel to read.
Great post.

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5 09 2011
Walkowiak2690@gmail.com

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18 11 2013
Why Harry Potter is Great Literature | Humane Pursuits

[…] and will, if he can help it, survive him. Harry grows up in part through a process of developing aย homeย and responsibilities to it. Most Millennials Iโ€™ve talked to agree that they feel more homesick […]

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17 07 2015
Why Harry Potter Is Great Literature | Aleteia

[…] and will, if he can help it, survive him. Harry grows up in part through a process of developing a home and responsibilities to it. Most Millennials I’ve talked to agree that they feel more […]

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